Spikefield Hazard deals 1 damage to any target. It’s possible that the counterspell functionality needs to be limited further for balancing purposes. ILLUSTRATED BY. Targeting any permanent allows Pyroblast to be cast even when there isn't anything to actually destroy. Having a discard spell that offers early game functionality while also not being a completely dead top-deck in the late game is a nice way to mitigate a commonly detrimental opportunity cost. Spells that lack the ability to interact favorably with multiple card types are decreasing in playability as the  delta in power between threats and their requisite answers grows. While the floor of this card is a pump spell, the additional functionality allows for some counter play against midrange and control style strategies. Sorcery Some early sets featured these cards, but they’ve been seemingly removed from the design zeitgeist by this point. When I started working on potential ideas, the blue-based implementations were fairly easy to compose since they most easily adhere to the basic idea of a counterspell stapled to a removal spell. Card design has skewed toward an emphasis on increasing the power level of threats while answers have largely stagnated in their progression. My goal here wasn’t to provide all of the answers but present some potential thought provoking ideas, so I’d love to hear what people think on this matter and see any ideas folks come up with. When the immediate impact of the average spell resolving is so high, the demand for counterspells increases. You gain X life. (If this spell targets a permanent, play it as an instant.) The concept of a removal spell is a concrete idea although what constitutes as a counterspell can skew towards the abstract. The following will all be examples of the type of design that I’m trying to illustrate in theory. It’s not uncommon for decks such as Snowko or Miracles to play red solely to facilitate it. $4.74. For example, would you consider cards such as Heroic Intervention, Veil of Summer or Apostle’s Blessing as counterspell effects? The fateseal mechanic is commonly attributed to blue but white effects that place cards on top of their owners’ library, such as. When I started working on potential ideas, the blue-based implementations were fairly easy to compose since they most easily adhere to the basic idea of a counterspell stapled to a removal spell. The next consideration was exactly how powerful these effects should be. Not a Tournament Legal card. The Fuse mechanic was the last addition to this card. See cards from the most recent sets and discover what players just like you are saying about them. Target creature gets +1/+1 and gains your choice of deathtouch or lifelink until end of turn. legal Premodern; legal Vintage; Rulings. MMA Modern Masters TPR Tempest Remastered MM2 Modern Masters 2015 PZ1 Legendary Cube Prizes EMA Eternal Masters MS2 Kaladesh Inventions V16 From the Vault: Lore PZ2 Treasure Chest AER Aether Revolt MM3 Modern Masters 2017 MS3 Amonkhet Invocations V14 From the Vault: Annihilation V15 From the Vault: Angels M19 Core Set 2019 MH1 Modern Horizons Gatherer is the Magic Card Database. Posted by 17 hours ago ), Synchronized Spellcraft deals 4 damage to target creature and X damage to that creature's controller, where X is the number of creatures in your party. You can also visit your purchase opportunities page filtered by this card, to see at a glance the best seller offers. (Your party consists of up to one each of Cleric, Rogue, Warrior, and Wizard. • Target non-Human creature you control gets +1/+1 and gains indestructible until end of turn. Meaning, that while under normal circumstances, it won’t be the central effect on a card, it might be something that operates as a supplementary effect. At this point, black counterspells are largely nonexistent as the color has skewed more heavily toward discard as its primary form of non-field-based interaction. 486. It has some interesting implications in terms of gameplay patterns. legal. In order to gain context I researched how the effect has been historically implemented relative to each color throughout the years. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Browse through cards from Magic's entire history. not legal. Text: Choose one — • Counter target spell if it's blue. MTGO WikiPrice is the leading Magic the Gathering Online card pricing system with thousands of MTGO bots that buy and sell the cards you're looking for Force of Will [EMA] Wasteland [EMA] Ashnod's Altar [EMA] Karakas [EMA] Jace, the Mind Sculptor [EMA] Entomb [EMA] Daze [EMA] Dack Fayden [EMA] Mana Crypt [EMA] Pyroblast [EMA] Chrome Mox [EMA] Most searched. Additionally, similar to white, there is a focus on protecting your own permanents as opposed to directly impeding opposing effects. The concept of a removal spell is a concrete idea although what constitutes as a counterspell can skew towards the abstract. Such to say, there are a number of counterspells with the specific purpose of protecting either you or your permanents, which is interesting because outright counterspells are a tertiary effect of the white portion of the color pie. [Card name] deals 3 damage to target creature or planeswalker. Some lists run a split either because: The … Barge In. Pyroblast. For example cards like Veil of Summer and Aether Gust have seen major and minor play in formats going as far back as Legacy, while Noxious Grasp and Devout Decree have barely made their way out of Standard. Given that “counter target spell” is a primary effect of blue, there hasn’t been much of a philosophical shift, just some variation on cost and additional effects adding additional functionality, especially when paired with additional colors. I think it’s pretty free to add that functionality without worry of the card being too powerful. As such, I felt that it wasn’t completely absurd to appropriate the fateseal mechanic as a sort of “proactive” counterspell. So, my goal is to create effects that will have varying degrees of format penetration. Mana costs don't seem too restrictive, but adding some dual lands would help consistency a lot. Damage and effects that say "destroy" don't destroy it. Black’s counterspells are very much in line with the color’s identity. • Destroy target permanent if it's blue. ”SB” indicates this is a sideboard card. Force of Will [EMA] ... Jace, the Mind Sculptor [EMA] Daze [EMA] Entomb [EMA] Pyroblast [EMA] Mana Crypt [EMA] Dack Fayden [EMA] Chrome Mox [EMA] Most searched. Kaja Foglio . How does that song go? Aether Vial [TD0] ... Karakas [TD0] Skullclamp [TD0] Enlightened Tutor [TD0] Reaping the Graves [TD0] Pyroblast [TD0] Lightning Bolt [TD0] Rhystic Study [TD0] Moment's Peace [TD0] Most searched. For example cards like, Creature-based implementations of this design concept are pretty interesting because they present unique play pattern opportunities. I paid 20 bucks for my playset of pyroblast over the summer and didn't wanna pay for the hydroblasts now I'll have both … Target creature you control gets +2/+2 and trample until the end of turn. —Jaya Ballard, Task Mage Counter target spell unless unless its controller pays 3. enters the battlefield, choose a nonland card name. You may put that card on the bottom of that player’s library. © 2020 MTG Assist • Target creature you control gets +1/+1 and gains hexproof until end of turn. Not Legal: Modern: Not Legal: Vintage: Legal: Legacy: Legal: Commander: Legal: Classic: Not Legal: Best from Theme Deck Set. Ultimately, there’s a lot of ground that can be covered here. • Shredded Sails deals 4 damage to target creature with flying. "Just the thing for those pesky water mages." (Any amount of damage a creature with deathtouch deals to a creature is enough to destroy it. “I got the Mana Leak, I got the Lightning Strike, I got the combination Mana Leak Lightning Strike.”. Target attacking creature gets +2/+2 until end of turn. Put target nonland permanent with converted mana cost X on top of its owner’s library. Additionally, I started bouncing around the idea of equipment that would somehow play into this dynamic, but coming up with an elegant design proved to be a bit too dubious. While this article is about a red spell, this is a portion of the color pie that facilitates this dynamic fairly poorly. Blue is pretty straight-forward. MODERN ANNOUNCEMENT: MTG ARENA IS NOW BANNED. Counter target spell. Pauper. When you draw a card, you may pay X mana and choose one: This might be my favorite card from the presented idea. ”SB” indicates this is a sideboard card. (If this spell targets a permanent, play it as an instant.) : Draw a card. "Just the thing for those pesky water mages." Another fairly straightforward idea. • Exile up to twice X target cards from graveyards. Instant. Articles and comments are user-submitted and do not represent official endorsements of this site. Set: Oversize Cards Type: Interrupt Cost: null Counter target spell if it is blue, or destroy target permanent if it is blue. I wanted an effect that was strong enough to see play in eternal formats without being too game breaking. Being able to cash in a known effect for a random card that could be situationally better is fine, but flexible known quantities that have the ability to impact a high number of game states seem much more appealing. Commander: Legal Duel: Legal Legacy: Legal Pauper: Legal Vintage: Legal. (Your party consists of up to one each of Cleric, Rogue, Warrior, and Wizard.). $4.67. If the spell is redirected, this mode can't be changed, so only targets of the selected type are valid. Damage dealt by a creature with lifelink also causes its controller to gain that much life.). “Spells that lack the ability to interact favorably with multiple card types are decreasing in playability as the delta in power between threats and their requisite answers grows.”. Untap it. However, I think an increased layer of consistency is needed. Each attacking non-Human creature gains trample until end of turn. • Destroy target permanent if it's blue. Alternatively, when a black counterspell exists, it’s a UB spell. Search for the perfect addition to your deck. (If this spell targets a permanent, play it as an instant.) They either only interact with a limited array of targets such as creature spells or enemy colors or they require some sort of additional cost, usually in the form of life points. Target attacking creature gets +2/+2 until end of turn. I made the cost restrictive to circumvent one of the biggest issues that Pyroblast proper has: it’s so easy to splash while being extremely potent. I don’t think an effect like this would be good outside of combo shells but it’s interesting to mull over. With this dynamic, and proposed solution in mind I’ve found myself wondering what modern day “Pyroblast” effects, or alternatively what suitably flexible answers would look like. Modern was created by Wizards of the Coast in the Spring of 2011 as a response to the increasing popularity of the Legacy format, which although popular proved difficult to access due to the high price of staple cards. Honestly, that might not even be good enough, though this could help address Pioneer’s general issues with addressing combo decks. Pyroblast can be obtained through Classic card packs, through crafting, or as an Arena reward. I think, given their contextual usages, the answer is “yes.” This led me to ponder how each color would conceptualize a counterspell in the modern day. Lawrence Harmon is a Magic theorist who specializes in analyzing metagames and tuning decks for those metagames. My goal when fleshing out a lot of these cards was to make them a reward for playing a certain color, not be the sole reason to do so. Contact MTG Assist • My concern with that is the potential for it to be too good in aggressive shells so I left it as is. Though, some of the effects ended up falling outside of that framework. For example, would you consider cards such as. We’ve also seen punisher mechanics come into play with black counterspells. Practiced Tactics deals damage to that creature equal to twice the number of creatures in your party. Other cards (high tide, turnabout) don’t offer anything other than an avenue for combo players to break the game, and the modern community usually responds negatively when such decks are on top. Whites counterspells are either color-swapped versions of conditional blue counters, or they play into white’s subtheme of protection. Green’s counterspells function similarly to red’s. ... You may use any printing of a card that has an appearance in a standard legal set. A lot of cards banned in modern are legal in pauper, but the strongest cards in modern are almost all rare or unco. Put a reach counter on it. As I mentioned before, the restriction of colorless mana has generally allowed for some pushed designs. Black’s counterspells are very much in line with the color’s identity. Target creature gets +1/+3 until end of turn. All of them operate under some sort of restriction. The casting cost template of 1(Primary Color)(Phyrexian Blue) lends itself well to a series of multifunctional counterspells that can be played in Ux shells, but at the cost of two life, it can open other colors up to having some sort of counterspell functionality. I decided to get a bit wonky with the color pie here.